SHARE ON...

2014_267 Friends Banner Ads _Wristband AW

Behind the scenes at the Tomorrow film

Veteran soldiers at Help for Heroes Recovery Centre, Tedworth House, were given roles as extras in the latest Martin Scorsese film, Tomorrow.

Tomorrow, due for release autumn 2015, spent a day filming at the Tidworth based Recovery Centre last Sunday, using eight veterans as extras. The film candidly explores the difficulty and loneliness soldiers encounter as they try to get back into society having served for their country; moving on from losses and injuries to forge a life, find sustaining work and experience love.

Tomorrow Film1

This is a very topical and timely film, with the end of the UK combat mission in Afghanistan due to take place by the end of the year when British troops will be withdrawn after 13 years of intense fighting, which left nearly 75,000 British men and women in need of physical or psychological support. The film is supporting Help for Heroes and is backing our “Friends” campaign, to encourage regular donating.

Tomorrow Film2

Help for Heroes Director of Recovery, David Richmond, said: “We are so pleased that Tomorrow is tackling some of the very real issues that impact upon our servicemen, women and veterans. As we withdraw from Afghanistan, it is especially important that we don’t forget the long term effects that conflict can have on the people who put themselves on the line for our country – the physical and psychological scars are rarely easy or quick to heal.”

The veterans were asked to play a game of wheelchair basketball and do some training in the gym, which would be used in the background of certain scenes. Veteran Jason Zawaisa said it was a good experience to be involved.

Tomorrow Film3

“It was different and really exciting,” he said. “It’s not every day you get to be involved in a film. It is nice to see a film being made which will hopefully accurately show the experiences me and others have gone through. I’m looking forward to seeing it.”

Tomorrow Film

Director Martha Pinson said Tedworth House provided an inspiring environment for her, the cast and all of the crew. She said: “ Tomorrow explores the difficulty of moving on from loses and injuries, to forge a life, to find sustaining work, and experience love. This is an acute challenge for a person in their mid‐late 20’s, which has not been extensively explored.”

2014_267 Friends Banner Ads _Phone AW

Categories :

Chelsea Pensioners visit Tedworth House

Wounded, injured and sick service personnel and veterans at Help for Heroes Recovery Centre Tedworth House welcomed a group of Chelsea Pensioners this week.

Chelsea4

The Pensioners enjoyed a tour of Tedworth House and played some indoor games alongside our WIS. Inside Tedworth House Phoenix Centre they were invited to team up with our residents and play badminton, basketball, golf, football and giant Jenga. The day was rounded off with a rather competitive game of sitting volleyball!

Centre manager Giles Woodhouse said: “Our residents were honoured to have the Chelsea Pensioners visit their centre and they relished the opportunity to play games with them and interact, sharing their various experiences.

Chelsea6

“We recognise the enormous debt we owe to these men and their colleagues and it is wonderful to see that they were equally humbled to meet our heroes.”

Veteran Mark Povey said it was a hugely uplifting day for him. “I was born in Chelsea so for me to spend the day with these gentlemen was an honour,” he said.

“We got to spend the day talking with them and I explained the good work Help for Heroes do and how the charity has really helped me. They were really happy to listen and it was inspirational to hear them talk about their time in the Armed Forces too and share their incredible life stories.”

Chelsea7

Chelsea Pensioner Alan Lee, 92, said he enjoyed a wonderful day.

“I’ve been to Tedworth House before and it just gets better. We get to see how Tedworth House is really helping our heroes and we learn so much from our visit. I hope to come back again!”

2014_267 Friends Banner Ads _Wristband AW

Categories :

Fundraiser Dave Smith's 630 mile south coast trek

Dave Smith of Roundhay spent the last three months picking his way round the south coast of the UK, sleeping in a tent every night, and carrying essentials in a rucksack round his shoulders. He's so far raised an incredible £2,500 for Help for Heroes - help him swell that figure by donating via his bmycharity page.

Dave Smith

Dave, 60 years old and a former HR manager, said his adventure saw him climb about 115,000ft - nearly four times the height of Mount Everest. He managed to lose a whopping 2 stone in body weight, and if that wasn't enough, his epic journey even helped him regain his sense of smell, something he lost four years ago.

Dave Smith 2

Perhaps unsurprisingly, it was recommended by Dave's doctor that in no way should he attempt this mammoth trek but Dave's planning for it was already in motion; the challenge was a year in the planning following a family holiday in Cornwall.

Dave Smith 3

Dave said, "Whilst the bulk of the time I was on my own I didn't feel alone and at no stage (after the first week) did it feel like a tough event. I had plenty of contact from the H4H team and knew that if I needed help or support it was there.

"H4H is more than a charitable organisation; it has captured, and represents, the hearts of the nation. I'm proud to have been able to make a contribution."

Dave Smith 4

2014_267 Friends Banner Ads _Wristband AW

Categories :

Vital DMWS welfare role secures funding from Help for Heroes

Help for Heroes are pleased to announce a further £29,000 in grant funding to the Defence Medical Welfare Service (DMWS) to secure the continuation of a specialist Welfare Officer at Tedworth House Recovery Centre in Tidworth.

BOBs-and-BOSs-at-Tedworth-House

To date, we have now provided £75,000 to DMWS to ensure this important welfare specialist is available to support our wounded, injured and sick residents and their families at the Recovery Centre. Offering holistic, practical, and emotional help, the DMWS Welfare Officer is a crucial member of the Tedworth House team.

In addition to round-the-clock support, the DMWS Welfare Officer accompanies residents to their outside clinical or medical appointments and is able to report back to the team at Tedworth House Recovery Centre on any welfare needs that may arise. Once referred back to the Support Hub, the Welfare Office can ensure any new needs are assessed and picked up as swiftly as possible.  He or she is responsible for the day to day welfare of all of the residents at Tedworth House Recovery Centre and of their visitors.

Giles Woodhouse, Centre Manager at Tedworth House said: “We are enormously grateful for the services of the DMWS, especially with the way that they facilitate that round-the-clock continuity. DMWS have the respect of the staff and the Personnel Recovery Centre and they are an intrinsic part of our safeguarding net. Help for Heroes are thrilled to be able to support the continuation of this key welfare role for another year of invaluable service.”

Band of Sisters member Rachel Elkins knows first-hand the invaluable support provided by the DMWS Welfare Officer:

DMWS“They are a true God send,” she said. “When my family needed someone to talk to or help us with certain appointments, they were there and that is so important. Knowing you have someone you can turn to and trust 100% is vital to recovery and coping with your situation. My husband was diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and I am not sure we could have coped without our Welfare Officer, she has been so crucial to us as a family.”

Nicky Murdoch, Chief Executive, DMWS says; “We are delighted to have been awarded funding from Help for Heroes to continue our Welfare Service at Tedworth House.  Our work compliments Team Tedworth and is an excellent example of Military charities working together to provide the best possible service to our Armed Forces”

2014_267 Friends Banner Ads _Phone AW

Bryn's Blog October: 7 Years On

Help for Heroes is seven years old. 

Emma nor I could ever have foreseen that when we decided ‘to just do something’ we would be still doing it years later, let alone doing it alongside a superb team of staff, volunteers and fund raisers. I suppose we thought we would raise a great deal of money, ‘ do our bit’ and then get back to our lives. It has not quite worked out like that.

I sometimes wonder how on earth we ended up founding and working for an organisation like H4H and it made me think back to my own life to better understand my motivation.

 I was four and a half when my father, a Lieutenant Colonel in the army, a Military Cross winner who had twice been wounded in Burma, was killed on active service and my mother got the knock on the door. We had three weeks to clear our house and returned to England to live in a caravan. Mum drove the tractor and milked the cows; it was years before we got any compensation. I went to school as a charity kid, educated for free because my father had served. I followed in his footsteps at eighteen, joined the army and I had completed two operational tours and had seen a fellow soldier killed before my twenty first birthday. In 1981, on my last tour of Northern Ireland, we lost seven men in our part of South Armagh. A year later our Regimental Band was blown up in Regents Park, killing another seven and the rest were injured. I served for ten years and then became a father to my son who is serving now. He has buried five of his friends, killed in action, and has many friends who will live with their injuries.

                           5473 Bryn

I think I understand why I work for Help for Heroes. I understand that terrible things happen and good people are killed or injured; I can't prevent that. I can’t stop young men and women from volunteering to serve, and nor would I if I could; I loved my time in the army. I can’t stop them being shot, blown up or suffering from awful, sometimes hidden, physical and mental injuries. I can’t prevent families being torn apart or lives being irrevocably changed; that’s beyond me.

What can I do? I can make a difference. I can help make their lives better. I can play my part in their recovery. So can you.

Together, we are making a difference, rebuilding shattered lives, offering hope where there was despair. These young men and women are our boys and girls now. Together we have celebrated Ben getting married, seen Steve beat his predicated sales in his new business, wiped away a tear when we have seen Jack walk on his prosthetics or smiled to see Jon build his house.

Now we have more to do. We need to give Jason a reason to live, Bernie the psychological support she needs to cope, Nick the opportunity to start again. We won’t get it right each time, we know that, we can’t do it for them. They have to rebuild their lives, become independent and fulfilled, that’s their challenge. All we can do is help them on their way and be there when they need us. We have much to do and our support must continue for years to come. 

I think I understand why I’m doing this and I think you know why you are as well; it's personal.  We are working together to do what we can to help and we are making a difference. 

Thank you for joining us in this effort. 

Onwards and Upwards

Bryn Parry Signature

2014_267 Friends Banner Ads _Wristband AW

Categories :